Govinda unplugged on Radio One

MUMBAI: True to his name Virar-ka-chokra, Govinda spills the beans on his attachment with the local trains and much more on Radio One FM 94.3’s award winning show, “BBC Ek Mulakat” on Sunday, August 5th, 2007. Sanjeev Srivastava, India Editor of BBC Hindi will anchor the show which will broadcast in Mumbai and New Delhi at 12 noon. 


Undisputedly one of the best actor and dancer in the country, Govinda talks about his bizarre yet uplifting experience in the train, years back, which made him value both the local train and some important lessons in life. 


Chichi, as his mother and now the entire film fraternity addresses with affection, came across as an extremely focused and giving human being. He gives us an insight on how veterans like Dilip Kumar and Dharmendra inspired him to do the kind of roles he did. He also respects and gives credit to his colleagues and co-stars of today like Karisma, Katrina and the others who helped him become a little more ‘English’ and how he helped them become a little ‘desi’. Govinda feels that his rustic, village boy image has played a major role in his success. Whether it was the films with Neelam or Karishma or his recent flick with Katrina, he feels that his simpleton image in contrast with the sophisticated, urban image of his heroines has created a new energy which has clicked with the masses. 


On quizzing him about his take on his comic actor image, Govinda replies, “The artist in me is trapped in this image and struggling. But all said and done, I’m happy with it. Now every one has plunged in this genre and is trying their hand at comedy.” 


Dilip Kumar, Dharmendra and Amitabh Bachchan are his favourite actors and he enjoys the on-screen equation he shares with Salman Khan and Sunjay Dutt when it comes to comedy. “From the point of view of learning, Dilip Kumar and Amitabh Bachchan are the best, they are great icons”, he adds.   


Govinda also dwells on his political career, where again his urge to do some good for the betterment of the local trains is evident. He jokes, “When I started campaigning I used to look like a Punjabi hero, however at the end of it I resembled a South-Indian hero”, but adds “My thoughts are not just mine; it includes the advice and blessings from elders”. 


When asked if he was happy with his political innings, he states, “Happiness or not is a non-issue in politics. Here its all about are you together or not?”  


One thing is for sure; Govinda is a man of words. “Whether politics drenches you or not, it keeps your feet wet. It’s to be seen how much it troubles or satisfies you”, he says.   


When queried about how he handles the criticism targeted at him, Govinda rather puts it in simple words stating, “If the critic is honest then he’s the best friend, if not, then he’s just a part of society. My focus is my goal.” 


For more interesting insights that Sanjeev Srivastava discusses with Govinda, tune-in to BBC Ek Mulakat on Radio One FM 94.3 on Sunday, August 5th, 2007 at 12 noon.