REVIEW: Gangs of Wasseypur 2

Gangs of Wasseypur - Part 2
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part 2
Gangs of Wasseypur - Part 2
Gangs of Wasseypur – Part 2

Anticipation was high for the concluding part of Gangs of Wasseypur directed by Anurag Kashyap. As expected, the film is high on content and style but low on story and engagement.

The vengeance saga continues, being passed on down generations. From Shahid Khan to the now deceased Sardar, the rivalry and feud with Ramadhir Singh (Tigmanshu Dhulia) now reaches the next generation, led by Sardar’s oldest son Danish. Also simmering with rage and with various levels of persecution complex or misplaced arrogance are the other sons – brothers Faizal (Nawazuddin Siddiqui) and Perpendicular (Aditya Kumar) and half brother Definite (Zeishan Quadri), born from Durga (Reema Sen).

[pullquote_right]Overall the length and content are a big deterrent but the style and attention to detail give you enough material to hope for a fitting dénouement. There are only a few surprises, one of which is saved for the end.[/pullquote_right]

This time the action keeps moving forward, which makes following the narrative a whole lot easier than it was in part 1, however the story is not nearly as absorbing and the character development relatively shallow. The only relationship that touches you somewhere is that of Faizal and his wife Mohsina (Huma Qureshi) who bond over Ray Bans, Hindi films and cheesy love songs.

Double crossing, inexplicable anger, indiscriminate killings, lawlessness and a general arrogance in the characters is carried forward interspersed with black humour and clever one-liners. And it’s tied together with gun shots, bomb blasts, cold blooded killing and an optimism that belies the reality of a doomed situation.

Like part one the supporting cast is superb as are principals like Siddiqui and Quadri (who is also the writer of these films). The first hour suffers from scattered editing as well as a story that tells you nothing more than Faizal becoming established as a power centre in Wasseypur. But, like his father whose weakness was women, Faizal too has an addiction – ganja, and this distracts him from his purpose. Once more revenge is omnipresent but not a priority. Bullets and guns blaze here with such alarming casualness that death becomes routine, and mourning a luxury.

Unlike in part 1, Kashyap does not use music as well with a couple of songs beginning to jar. Overall the length and content are a big deterrent but the style and attention to detail give you enough material to hope for a fitting dénouement. There are only a few surprises, one of which is saved for the end.

Rating: ***